Drugs Channel
Topics & Medications
Quicklinks
Related Channels

Tacrolimus Side Effects

Possible Side Effects

Tacrolimus has been studied extensively in clinical trials. In these studies, the side effects that occurred in a group of people taking the drug were carefully documented and compared to the side effects that occurred in a group of people taking a different medication or a placebo (a product that does not contain any active ingredients). As a result, it was possible to see what side effects occurred, how often they appeared, and how they compared to the other groups.
 
The different forms of tacrolimus may have significantly different side effects. In clinical studies, the most commonly reported side effects of oral or injectable tacrolimus included:
 
  • Increased blood pressure (hypertension) -- in up to 89 percent of people
  • Diarrhea -- up to 72 percent
  • Increased blood sugar levels -- up to 70 percent
  • Anemia (low red blood cell counts) -- 65 percent
  • Headaches -- up to 64 percent
  • Insomnia -- up to 64 percent
  • Pain -- up to 63 percent
  • Abdominal (stomach) pain -- up to 59 percent
  • Tremors -- up to 56 percent
  • Kidney problems -- up to 56 percent
  • Weakness or low energy -- up to 52 percent.
 
In clinical studies, the most commonly reported side effects of tacrolimus ointment included:
 
  • Skin reactions at the application site, such as burning, stinging, redness, soreness, and itching -- in up to 58 percent of people
  • Flu-like symptoms -- up to 34 percent
  • Fever -- up to 21 percent
  • Headaches -- up to 20 percent
  • Increased coughing -- up to 18 percent
  • Skin infections -- up to 16 percent
  • Allergic reactions to the medication -- up to 13 percent
  • Asthma -- up to 13 percent
  • Sore throat -- up to 12 percent
  • Ear infection -- up to 12 percent.
 
Skin reactions are most noticeable when tacrolimus is first applied to the skin and are more common in the first few days of treatment. The reactions typically last 15 to 20 minutes after applying the medicine, and should subside as your eczema improves.
 

Tacrolimus Drug Information

Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.