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Miacalcin - Muromonab-CD3 Medication Information

This page contains links to eMedTV Drugs Articles containing information on subjects from Miacalcin to Muromonab-CD3 Medication Information. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Miconazole for Diaper Rash
    As this eMedTV page explains, miconazole/zinc oxide/white petrolatum is used for diaper rash in combination with a yeast infection. This segment describes the active ingredients in this product and explains why the treatment protocol is so important.
  • Miconazole/Zinc Oxide/White Petrolatum
    Miconazole/zinc oxide/white petrolatum is a diaper rash ointment that is available by prescription. This eMedTV article explains how miconazole/zinc oxide/white petrolatum is different from other ointments and describes the effects of the medication.
  • Miconazole/Zinc Oxide/White Petrolatum Dosing
    Miconazole/zinc oxide/white petrolatum should be applied to the rash after every diaper change. This eMedTV article provides other miconazole/zinc oxide/white petrolatum dosing information, including an explanation of how long the drug must be used.
  • Microgestin
    Microgestin is a combined oral contraceptive. This selection from the eMedTV site takes an in-depth look at Microgestin, including information on how it works, what you should talk to your doctor about before taking it, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Microgestin Dosing
    The standard Microgestin dosing is one tablet once a day. This eMedTV selection talks about the different strengths of Microgestin and explains how your healthcare provider will determine which strength of the drug is right for you.
  • Microgestin Information
    Are you looking for information on Microgestin? This eMedTV resource is a great starting point. It provides a brief overview of this birth control pill, stressing the importance of not missing any doses and offering a link to learn more.
  • Midasolan
    Before a medical procedure or surgery, your doctor may give you midazolam to sedate you. This eMedTV page lists certain conditions you should tell your doctor about before he or she gives you this drug. Midasolan is a common misspelling of midazolam.
  • Midazolam
    Midazolam is a drug that can be used as a sedative before and during surgeries and medical procedures. This eMedTV resource offers a more in-depth look at this medication and its effects, dosage guidelines, and general precautions.
  • Midazolam Dosing
    As this eMedTV page explains, midazolam dosing guidelines will vary from person to person, and a healthcare provider will consider several factors before determining your dose. This page also describes how the medication is administered.
  • Midazolam Hydrochloride
    This page of the eMedTV site provides a brief overview of midazolam hydrochloride. It discusses the different uses for this drug, when it may need to be avoided, and why it might be taken without food. There is also a link to more detailed information.
  • Midazolam Side Effects
    Side effects of midazolam may include nausea, vomiting, and drowsiness. This part of the eMedTV Web site highlights other potential midazolam side effects, including serious side effects that you should report to your healthcare provider right away.
  • Midazolan
    Midazolam is a medicine often used as a sedative for surgeries, medical procedures, and dental procedures. This eMedTV page describes the effects of midazolam and lists possible side effects of the drug. Midazolan is a common misspelling of midazolam.
  • Midozolan
    Midazolam is approved for use as a sedative, anxiety, or anesthesia medicine. This eMedTV article explains how and when midazolam is used and describes the effects of this medication. Midazolan is a common misspelling of midazolam.
  • Minoxadil
    Minoxidil is an over-the-counter (OTC) medicine used to treat male and female pattern baldness. This eMedTV Web page explains how often minoxidil should be used and describes possible side effects. Minoxadil is a common misspelling of minoxidil.
  • Minoxidil
    Minoxidil is a nonprescription medicine used to treat male and female pattern baldness. This portion of the eMedTV Web library offers a more detailed look at this drug and its uses, potential side effects, dosing information, and general precautions.
  • Minoxidil 15%
    Minoxidil comes in the form of a solution or a foam and is available in two strengths (2% or 5%). This eMedTV page explains that a minoxidil 15% product is not approved for use in the United States. A description of how to use minoxidil is also provided.
  • Minoxidil 2%
    This eMedTV page explains that if you have male or female pattern baldness, minoxidil 2% solution may help with hair growth. This article offers more details, including how minoxidil is used to stimulate hair growth and the strengths and forms available.
  • Minoxidil 5%
    If you have male pattern hair loss, you may benefit from minoxidil 5% foam or solution. This eMedTV selection provides more information on this product, including an explanation of why women should avoid this strength of minoxidil.
  • Minoxidil Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the dosing guidelines for treating hair loss with minoxidil are 1 mL of the liquid or half a capful of the foam applied to the scalp twice daily. This page offers other important tips for using this product.
  • Minoxidil Drug Information
    Minoxidil is a nonprescription medicine used to treat male and female pattern hair loss. This page from the eMedTV Web site further discusses this drug, including information on how minoxidil works, when and how to use it, and potential side effects.
  • Minoxidil Foam
    This eMedTV article explains that minoxidil comes in a foam and a liquid solution, and is applied to the scalp twice daily. This page also explains why some formulations of this hair product are meant only for men. A link to more details is also included.
  • Minoxidile
    Minoxidil can be purchased without a prescription and is used to treat male and female hair loss. This eMedTV resource further explores how the drug works, dosing guidelines, and potential side effects. Minoxidile is a common misspelling of minoxidil.
  • Minoxidill
    As this eMedTV page explains, minoxidil is available without a prescription for adults with male or female pattern baldness. An explanation of general dosing tips and side effects is also included. Minoxidill is a common misspelling of minoxidil.
  • Minoxodil
    Minoxidil is a nonprescription medicine used to treat male and female pattern baldness. This eMedTV article further discusses minoxidil and its specific uses, expected results, and potential side effects. Minoxodil is a common misspelling of minoxidil.
  • Mitomycin
    This eMedTV segment looks at how mitomycin can be prescribed for the treatment of stomach or pancreatic cancer. It describes how this chemotherapy medication works and discusses possible side effects, dosing instructions, and various other topics.
  • Mitomycin 10 Milligrams
    As this eMedTV article explains, the usual recommended dosage of mitomycin for treating stomach or pancreatic cancer is 10 milligrams to 20 milligrams per meter squared. This page explains how your dosage is calculated and offers a link to more details.
  • Mitomycin Chemotherapy Information
    As explained in this eMedTV article, mitomycin is a medicine used to treat stomach or pancreatic cancer in adults. This Web page covers more information on the chemotherapy drug and describes safety issues to be aware of while receiving mitomycin.
  • Mitomycin Dosage
    As discussed in this eMedTV article, the prescribed mitomycin dosage is calculated using a person's height and weight. More dosing guidelines are covered in this article, with tips on what to expect during chemotherapy treatment with this drug.
  • Mitomycin for Bladder Cancer
    Prescribing mitomycin to treat bladder cancer is an off-label (unapproved) use of the drug. This eMedTV Web selection discusses what this drug is approved for and explains how it works. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Mitomycin Injection
    As discussed in this eMedTV Web selection, mitomycin is given by injection into a vein (intravenously) once every six to eight weeks. This article looks at the factors that may affect the mitomycin dose and provides a link to more details.
  • Mitomycin Side Effects
    Contact your doctor if you develop problems like fever or difficulty breathing while using mitomycin. This eMedTV Web page focuses on other possible side effects of mitomycin, including common reactions and those that require urgent medical treatment.
  • Mitomycin-C
    Healthcare providers may recommend mitomycin as a chemotherapy treatment for certain types of cancers. This eMedTV page explains how the active ingredient in this drug (mitomycin-C) can help treat stomach or pancreatic cancer and links to more details.
  • Mitomycin-C Side Effects
    This eMedTV article explains that diarrhea, drowsiness, and headaches are some of the possible side effects of mitomycin-C, the active ingredient in the chemotherapy drug mitomycin. This article lists other problems and provides a link to more details.
  • Mometasone Cream
    As this eMedTV segment explains, applying mometasone furoate cream to the affected areas of skin once daily can help relieve itching and inflammation caused by eczema and dermatitis. This page describes other possible uses and links to more details.
  • Mometasone for Allergies
    Nasal allergies are often treated with a nasal spray that contains mometasone. This selection from the eMedTV Web site offers more information on this use of mometasone and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Mometasone Furate Cream
    Mometasone furoate cream is a drug prescribed to treat skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis. This eMedTV page covers possible side effects and safety precautions. Mometasone furate cream is a common misspelling of mometasone furoate cream.
  • Mometasone Furoate Cream
    Available by prescription, mometasone furoate cream can help treat skin conditions such as eczema. This eMedTV segment describes how this steroid works to treat various skin problems, offers general dosing guidelines, and lists potential side effects.
  • Mometasone Furoate Cream Dosage
    This eMedTV Web selection explains that the dosing guidelines for mometasone furoate cream call for applying a thin layer to the affected areas once a day. This article also outlines some important tips for how to use this medicated skin cream.
  • Mometasone Furoate Cream Information
    This eMedTV article offers important information on mometasone furoate cream, a drug prescribed to treat skin conditions like eczema and dermatitis. This page also explains why this cream is not suitable for everyone and lists possible side effects.
  • Mometasone Furoate Cream Side Effects
    Boils, acne, and thinning skin are some of the possible side effects of mometasone furoate cream. This eMedTV page lists other potential reactions to this cream, including serious problems that need medical care and possible long-term effects of the drug.
  • Mometasone Nasal Spray
    Mometasone nasal spray has been licensed to treat nasal polyps and allergic rhinitis. This eMedTV resource offers an overview of the drug, including how it works, possible side effects, and tips on when and how to use it.
  • Mometasone Nasal Spray Dosing
    As this eMedTV resource explains, mometasone nasal spray dosing guidelines will be based on several factors, such as your age and the condition being treated. This page lists typical dosage amounts for treating nasal allergies and nasal polyps.
  • Mometsone Cream
    A doctor may prescribe mometasone furoate cream to treat eczema, psoriasis, or various other skin problems. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of this drug, including dosing tips. Momesone cream is a common misspelling of mometasone furoate cream.
  • MonoNessa
    MonoNessa is a prescription oral contraceptive that contains two hormones, estrogen and progestin. This eMedTV page offers dosing information for this drug, lists possible side effects that may occur, and explains how this form of birth control works.
  • MonoNessa Contraceptives
    As this eMedTV page explains, MonoNessa belongs to a class of drugs known as oral contraceptives. This article gives a brief overview of this birth control pill, including details on what to expect. Also included is a link to more information.
  • MonoNessa Dosing
    Neglecting to follow MonoNessa dosing guidelines can significantly increase your risk for pregnancy. This eMedTV segment describes how to start the pill for the first time and also explains what you should do if you miss any MonoNessa doses.
  • MonoNessa Side Effects
    Most MonoNessa side effects, such as bloating or nausea, are bothersome but usually not dangerous. As this eMedTV page explains, however, serious side effects are possible and may require medical attention (such as depression or breast lumps).
  • Monoxidil
    Minoxidil is a nonprescription drug used to treat male and female pattern baldness. This eMedTV segment offers a more in-depth look at minoxidil and its uses, effects, and possible side effects. Monoxidil is a common misspelling of minoxidil.
  • Movicor
    This page from the eMedTV Web library explains how Mevacor works to treat certain health conditions related to heart disease. This page also describes the factors that may affect your Mevacor dosage. Movicor is a common misspelling of Mevacor.
  • Muromonab Mechanism of Action
    By making the immune system less active, muromonab-CD3 can help treat organ transplant rejection. This eMedTV Web page further explores the mechanism of action for murmonab-CD3 and provides a link to more detailed information on this prescription drug.
  • Muromonab-CD3
    Muromonab-CD3 is used to treat transplant rejection after a heart, kidney, or liver transplant. This eMedTV segment gives an overview of this prescription medication, with details on how it works to treat organ rejection, dosing tips, and more.
  • Muromonab-CD3 Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, muromonab-CD3 dosing guidelines will vary, depending on your age and various other factors. This page further describes the factors that may affect your dose and explains how this medication is administered.
  • Muromonab-CD3 Medication Information
    Muromonab-CD3 is a drug that helps keep the body from rejecting a new heart, liver, or kidney. This eMedTV resource provides more information on muromonab-CD3, including how this prescription medication works, side effects, and safety precautions.
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