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Pantoprazole Sodium - Precautions and Warnings of Pravastatin

This page contains links to eMedTV Drugs Articles containing information on subjects from Pantoprazole Sodium to Precautions and Warnings of Pravastatin. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Pantoprazole Sodium
    This part of the eMedTV site offers some basic information on pantoprazole sodium, a proton pump inhibitor. Topics covered in this article include specific conditions it can treat, when and how it is given, and more.
  • Pantoprozole
    As this eMedTV page explains, pantoprazole is prescribed to treat several conditions, such as GERD and erosive esophagitis. This page discusses general dosing guidelines and how the drug works. Pantoprozole is a common misspelling of pantoprazole.
  • PEG-3350 Electrolytes for Oral Solution
    As this eMedTV article explains, polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution contains polyethylene glycol (PEG-3350), an oral laxative used to empty the bowels before certain gastrointestinal procedures. This resource further discusses how to use this drug.
  • PEG-3350 Solution Electrolytes
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution is a combination of polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG-3350) and electrolytes. This solution is used to prep the bowel for a gastrointestinal procedure, such as a colonoscopy.
  • Pegfilgrastim
    Pegfilgrastim is a medication that is prescribed to prevent infections in people undergoing chemotherapy. This eMedTV article offers a more in-depth look at pegfilgrastim and its effects, dosing information, and potential side effects.
  • Pegfilgrastim Dosing
    The recommended pegfilgrastim dosage for all adults is 6 mg injected once per chemotherapy cycle. This eMedTV Web page provides other pegfilgrastim dosing information, including precautions and tips on when and how to administer the injection.
  • Pegfilgrastim for Cancer
    As this brief eMedTV segment explains, pegfilgrastim is a drug used for preventing chemotherapy-related infections. This article explains why not everyone with cancer should use pegfilgrastim. This resource also includes a link to more information.
  • Peginesatide
    Peginesatide is a drug prescribed for the treatment of anemia due to chronic kidney disease. This eMedTV page offers a closer look at this medication, including how it works, side effects, and more. Links to more detailed information are also included.
  • Peginesatide Dosage
    As this eMedTV resource explains, peginesatide is injected slowly into a vein (intravenously) or just under the skin (subcutaneously) once a month. This article focuses on specific dosing guidelines for peginesatide, including how your dose is calculated.
  • Peginesatide Drug Information
    Adults who develop anemia due to chronic kidney disease may benefit from peginesatide. This page of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on this drug, including how peginesatide works and safety concerns. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Peginesatide Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV page, people receiving peginesatide injections may experience common reactions like nausea, diarrhea, and headaches. This page lists other side effects of peginesatide, including problems that require medical care.
  • Peginterferon Alfa-2b
    Peginterferon alfa-2b is a medicine prescribed to treat malignant skin cancer or hepatitis C. This eMedTV resource presents an in-depth look at this drug, with details on how it works, how it is given, and what you need to know before starting treatment.
  • Peginterferon Alfa-2b Dosage
    Peginterferon alfa-2b is injected just under the skin once a week. This eMedTV page examines the factors that may affect your individual dosage and the amount of time you use the medicine. A list of tips on how this injection is given is also included.
  • Peginterferon Alfa-2b Drug Information
    This eMedTV page explores some basic information on peginterferon alfa-2b, a drug prescribed to treat malignant melanoma and hepatitis C. This article also explains some general dosing guidelines and why this medicine may not be safe for some people.
  • Peginterferon Alfa-2b Side Effects
    This eMedTV page examines some of the clinical studies that were done on possible side effects of peginterferon alfa-2b, including common and potentially dangerous problems that could occur. Details on the statistics of these problems are also included.
  • Pentazocine and Naloxone
    Available as tablets, pentazocine/naloxone is used to treat moderate-to-severe pain in adults and children. This eMedTV Web page gives a brief overview of this medication and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Pentazocine/Naloxone
    Pentazocine/naloxone is a prescription drug used to relieve pain. A number of topics are discussed in this eMedTV resource, including the type of pain this product can treat, how it works, dosing instructions, possible side effects, and more.
  • Pentazocine/Naloxone Dosage
    Pentazocine/naloxone is generally taken every three to four hours. This eMedTV segment covers the more specific dosages of pentazocine/naloxone you may receive, depending on the severity of your pain and other factors.
  • Pentazocine/Naloxone Information
    Pentazocine/naloxone is taken every three to four hours to relieve moderate-to-severe pain. This eMedTV article provides more information on pentazocine/naloxone, including why this prescription drug may not be suitable for some people.
  • Pentazocine/Naloxone Side Effects
    Some of the reported side effects of pentazocine/naloxone include constipation, nausea, and confusion. This eMedTV article explains what to do if you develop problems while taking this drug and how to identify which reactions may require medical care.
  • Pentoprozole
    A doctor may prescribe pantoprazole to treat several conditions, such as GERD and erosive esophagitis. This eMedTV page explores potential side effects and offers some general dosing information. Pentoprozole is a common misspelling of pantoprazole.
  • Phenergan
    Phenergan is a medicine approved to treat nausea and various other conditions. This eMedTV page describes how this prescription drug works, explains what forms it comes in and how it is used, and lists some of the potential side effects to be aware of.
  • Phenergan 12.5 mg
    Phenergan comes in many forms and strengths. As this eMedTV Web page explains, a typical dosage for treating nausea and vomiting is Phenergan 12.5 to 25 mg every four to six hours as needed. This article also offers dosing guidelines for other uses.
  • Phenergan 25 mg
    The standard recommended dosage for treating allergies is Phenergan 25 mg before bedtime. This eMedTV resource also explains how dosing works when Phenergan is used as a sedative and for the treatment of nausea or vomiting and motion sickness.
  • Phenergan 50 mg
    Of the various strengths available for Phenergan, 50 mg is the highest one available. This eMedTV Web page contains dosing recommendations for the treatment of allergies, nausea and vomiting, motion sickness, and other conditions.
  • Phenergan and Breastfeeding
    Phenergan (promethazine) could pass through breast milk, but this has yet to be determined. This page on the eMedTV site offers a more in-depth look at breastfeeding and Phenergan, including what problems could theoretically occur.
  • Phenergan and Children
    Phenergan (promethazine) can be given to children as young as two years old. This eMedTV Web page further discusses the use of Phenergan in children and explores some of the warnings concerning the possible risks of giving this drug to young children.
  • Phenergan and Pregnancy
    At this time, it is unclear whether Phenergan (promethazine) is safe for pregnant women. This eMedTV resource offers more information on pregnancy and Phenergan, and describes some of the problems that may occur if a fetus is exposed to this drug.
  • Phenergan Dosage
    The standard recommended Phenergan dosage for treating allergies is 25 mg before bedtime. This page from the eMedTV archives also provides dosing guidelines for sedation and the treatment of motion sickness and nausea or vomiting.
  • Phenergan Drug Information
    Phenergan is a prescription drug used to treat nausea and other medical conditions. This eMedTV resource offers general warnings and precautions for Phenergan and explains what side effects may occur with this medicine.
  • Phenergan Drug Interactions
    Epinephrine, MAOIs, and certain other medicines may react negatively with Phenergan. This eMedTV article lists other medicines that can cause Phenergan drug interactions and describes the problems that may occur as a result and how they can be avoided.
  • Phenergan Effects
    Phenergan is used for treating nausea and vomiting, motion sickness, and various other conditions. As this eMedTV page explains, many Phenergan effects are most likely due to its antihistamine activity (the drug works by blocking histamine receptors).
  • Phenergan for Nausea
    Phenergan (promethazine) is a prescription medicine approved for treating nausea and vomiting. As this eMedTV Web page explains, doctors often treat vomiting and nausea with Phenergan when they are associated with surgery and certain types of anesthesia.
  • Phenergan Injection
    Phenergan can be given by injection, taken orally, or inserted rectally. This article found on the eMedTV Web site explains what this medication is used for and describes the injectable form of Phenergan in more detail.
  • Phenergan Medication Information
    Phenergan is used for treating nausea and vomiting, allergies, and various other conditions. This eMedTV article offers more information about the prescription medication Phenergan, including details on other approved uses and how dosing works.
  • Phenergan Oral
    There are four different forms of Phenergan: oral tablets and syrup, rectal suppositories, and an injection. This eMedTV segment describes these products in more detail and explains how often this medication is typically taken per day.
  • Phenergan Overdose
    Low blood pressure, hyperactivity, and seizures can all occur with a Phenergan overdose. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible overdose symptoms and explains what treatment options are available for someone who takes too much of this drug.
  • Phenergan Side Effects
    Dizziness, fatigue, and insomnia are possible negative reactions to Phenergan. This article from the eMedTV site lists other common Phenergan side effects and describes potentially serious problems that should be reported to your doctor right away.
  • Phenergan Suppositories
    Phenergan suppositories are typically used for treating nausea and vomiting. This eMedTV article describes how this medicine works, explains how to use rectal suppositories, and lists a few potential side effects of promethazine (the active ingredient).
  • Phenergan Tablets
    Phenergan comes in the form of tablets, syrup, rectal suppositories, and an injection. This eMedTV Web page lists the strengths available for the tablet form of Phenergan, describes the drug in more detail, and explains how dosing generally works.
  • Phenergan Uses
    Treating nausea and vomiting related to surgery or anesthesia is among the approved uses for Phenergan. This eMedTV segment discusses these and other uses (including off-label purposes) and explains how this medication works for various conditions.
  • Phenergan Warnings and Precautions
    If you have glaucoma, talk to your doctor before taking Phenergan. This eMedTV segment lists other precautions and warnings with Phenergan to be aware of before beginning treatment, including potentially serious reactions to the medication.
  • Phenergen
    Phenergan is a prescription medicine approved to treat allergies and various other conditions. This eMedTV page covers these uses in more detail and explains how this drug works for such different uses. Phenergen is a common misspelling of Phenergan.
  • Phenergran
    Phenergan is most commonly used to treat nausea, although it is approved for other uses as well. This eMedTV resource covers these other uses and explains what side effects may occur with this drug. Phenergran is a common misspelling of Phenergan.
  • Phenergren
    Phenergan is a prescription antihistamine approved for several different uses. This eMedTV segment explains what this medicine is used for and describes the various forms that it comes in. Phenergren is a common misspelling of Phenergan.
  • Phenergrin
    Phenergan is often prescribed for the treatment of nausea and vomiting. This eMedTV Web page discusses other approved uses and describes how this medicine works to treat different conditions. Phenergrin is a common misspelling of Phenergan.
  • Phengren
    Doctors often prescribe Phenergan for the treatment of nausea and vomiting. This eMedTV Web page explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this antihistamine medication. Phengren is a common misspelling of Phenergan.
  • Pimozide
    Pimozide is a drug prescribed for the treatment of Tourette syndrome. This eMedTV page examines various aspects of this drug, from dosing instructions, how it works, and possible side effects, to why it may not be the best choice for some people.
  • Pimozide Adverse Reactions
    Vision problems, abnormal behaviors, and headaches are some of the adverse reactions of pimozide. This eMedTV resource outlines other potential problems associated with this prescription drug. It also provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Pimozide and Fluoxetine
    It is usually not recommended to combine pimozide with fluoxetine, as dangerous side effects may occur. This eMedTV segment examines this drug interaction and the problems it can cause. It also links to more details on other possible interactions.
  • Pimozide and Tourette's
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, using pimozide for Tourette's can help control severe motor and verbal tics that affect a person's development or daily life. This page explains how this drug works and offers a link to more information on this drug.
  • Pimozide Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, pimozide tablets are taken one or more times a day to help control tics caused by Tourette syndrome. This article focuses on specific dosing guidelines for pimozide, including details on how your dose is calculated.
  • Pimozide Dose and Tourette's
    When treating Tourette's with pimozide, the initial dose will be based on age, weight, and other factors. This eMedTV Web page further discusses dosing guidelines for this prescription drug, including some specific amounts for adults and children.
  • Pimozide Drug Information
    Pimozide may control motor and verbal tics in adults and children as young as age 12 with Tourette syndrome. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on this drug, including how pimozide works and safety concerns. It also links to more details.
  • Pimozide for Delusions
    People who have certain types of delusions may receive pimozide. However, as this eMedTV segment explains, this would be considered an "off-label" (unapproved) use for the drug. This page discusses using this drug for treating delusional parasitosis.
  • Pimozide Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, people taking pimozide may experience common reactions like vision problems, sedation, and weakness. This resource outlines other possible side effects of pimozide, including problems that require medical care.
  • Pimozide Tablets
    Available as tablets, pimozide is used to treat motor and verbal tics due to Tourette syndrome. This eMedTV Web selection describes when this medicine is prescribed and covers some dosing instructions. It also links to more detailed information.
  • Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Colonoscopy
    A healthcare provider will prescribe polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution to empty the bowel. This eMedTV Web article explains how to mix the polyethylene glycol 3350 powder to prep the bowels for a colonoscopy and other gastrointestinal procedures.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution
    Polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution is prescribed to empty the bowels before certain procedures. This eMedTV article offers a complete overview of this laxative, including how it works, various products available, and tips on how to use it.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution passes through breast milk. This eMedTV page explains that no studies have been done on using polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution while breastfeeding, and why problems are probably unlikely.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution and Pregnancy
    If I'm pregnant, can I take polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution? This eMedTV segment addresses this question, explaining why the FDA classifies this laxative as a pregnancy Category C drug and describes when a doctor may recommend it.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution Dosage
    This eMedTV resource discusses general dosing guidelines for using the various polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution products. This page explains how to mix the powder, how often to drink the solution, and other important tips for using this laxative.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution Information
    Polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution is used to empty the bowels before gastrointestinal procedures. This eMedTV page offers important information on polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution, including how the laxative works and tips on using it.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution Overdose
    If you take too much polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution, it may cause vomiting and confusion. This eMedTV resource describes what else to expect with an overdose, including information on how a healthcare provider may treat any problems that occur.
  • Pomalidomide
    Pomalidomide is taken once daily to treat a type of cancer called multiple myeloma. This eMedTV Web page presents more details on this chemotherapy drug, including when it is used, how it works, side effects, and more.
  • Pomalidomide Dosage
    Pomalidomide capsules are taken once daily for 21 days, followed by a 7-day break from taking the drug. This eMedTV selection covers what to expect during treatment and includes an explanation of how your doctor will determine your pomalidomide dosage.
  • Pomalidomide Drug Information
    You may receive pomalidomide if you have a certain type of cancer called multiple myeloma. This eMedTV segment explores this chemotherapy drug, including information on pomalidomide's safety warnings and possible side effects.
  • Pomalidomide Side Effects
    As discussed in this eMedTV resource, clinical studies have shown that side effects occur often in people taking pomalidomide. This page offers a detailed look at which reactions occur most frequently, along with those that are potentially dangerous.
  • Pomelidomide
    As this eMedTV page explains, multiple myeloma may be treated with pomalidomide when at least two other anticancer drugs have been unsuccessful. This page covers dosing instructions and side effects. Pomelidomide is a common misspelling of pomalidomide.
  • Pomolidomide
    As this eMedTV article explains, people with multiple myeloma may benefit from treatment with pomalidomide. This resource gives a brief description of what to expect with this drug. Pomolidomide is a common misspelling of pomalidomide.
  • Potassium Iodide for Radiation Emergencies
    In a radiation emergency, who should take potassium iodide, and how much should be taken? This eMedTV article explains how to reduce your risk of thyroid problems, with details on how this form of iodine works. This page also describes what it cannot do.
  • Pravastatin
    Pravastatin is a drug used to treat high cholesterol and other conditions related to heart disease. This eMedTV segment provides an in-depth look at this drug, with information on how it works, possible side effects, dosing information, and more.
  • Pravastatin Side Effects
    Potential pravastatin side effects include nausea, headache, and diarrhea. This part of the eMedTV archives offers a more detailed list of possible side effects, including rare but serious problems such as insomnia, depression, and memory loss.
  • Pravastatin Sodium
    This eMedTV article takes a quick look at pravastatin, a prescription drug that is used to treat high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This Web page explains what else the medication can be used for and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Pravastatine
    Pravastatin is a medicine that can be prescribed to reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels. This eMedTV page offers more details on pravastatin and its uses, effects, and possible side effects. Pravastatine is a common misspelling of pravastatin.
  • Pravestatin
    Pravastatin is a drug licensed to treat conditions related to heart disease, such as high cholesterol. This eMedTV page covers other pravastatin uses and lists possible side effects of the medicine. Pravestatin is a common misspelling of pravastatin.
  • Pravistatin
    If you have high cholesterol or triglycerides, your doctor may give you pravastatin to lower these levels. This eMedTV page covers the effects, potential side effects, and other uses of this drug. Pravistatin is a common misspelling of pravastatin.
  • Pravostatin
    Pravastatin is a cholesterol medication that is available by prescription. This eMedTV resource further explains what pravastatin is used for and lists some of the drug's potential side effects. Pravostatin is a common misspelling of pravastatin.
  • Pravstatin
    Pravastatin is a prescription drug used for treating high cholesterol and triglycerides. This eMedTV article explains how pravastatin works, explores its effects, and lists its possible side effects. Pravstatin is a common misspelling of pravastatin.
  • Pravustatin
    Pravastatin is a medicine commonly used for treating high cholesterol and triglycerides. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains how pravastatin works and describes the effects of this drug. Pravustatin is a common misspelling of pravastatin.
  • Precautions and Warnings for Rosuvastatin
    Among the precautions and warnings for rosuvastatin covered in this eMedTV resource are potential drug interactions and the safety of taking rosuvastatin if you drink alcohol frequently or are over 65 years old, pregnant, or nursing.
  • Precautions and Warnings of Ezetimibe
    Ezetimibe can cause an increase in liver enzymes or serious muscle problems in some people taking it. This eMedTV page also lists other precautions and warnings of ezetimibe, like potential drug interactions and the safety of taking it while nursing.
  • Precautions and Warnings of Fluvastatin
    There are certain people who should not take fluvastatin, such as women who are pregnant or nursing. This eMedTV page offers other precautions and warnings of fluvastatin, including information on the drug's possible side effects.
  • Precautions and Warnings of Pravastatin
    This eMedTV article lists several precautions and warnings of pravastatin, including information on potential side effects. This resource also provides detailed information on who should avoid this drug, including women who are pregnant.
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